What greater consolation can come to a soul than to know that by patiently bearing some tribulation, it gives God the greatest pleasure in its power?

[…] If, devout soul, it is your will to please God and live a life of serenity in this world, unite yourself always and in all things to the divine will.

Reflect that all the sins of your past wicked life happened because you wandered from the path of God’s will.

[…] When anything disagreeable happens, remember it comes from God and say at once, “This comes from God” and be at peace: “I was dumb and opened not my mouth, because thou hast done it.

Lord, since thou hast done this, I will be silent and accept it. Direct all your thoughts and prayers to this end, to beg God constantly in meditation, Communion, and visits to the Blessed Sacrament that he help you accomplish his holy will.

Form the habit of offering yourself frequently to God by saying, “My God, behold me in thy presence; do with me and all that I have as thou pleasest.”

[…] How fortunate you, kind reader, if you too act thus! You will surely become a saint. Your life will be calm and peaceful; your death will be happy.

At death all our hope of salvation will come from the testimony of our conscience as to whether or not we are dying resigned to God’s will.

If during life we have embraced everything as coming from God’s hands, and if at death we embrace death in fulfillment of God’s holy will, we shall certainly save our souls and die the death of saints.

Let us then abandon everything to God’s good pleasure, because being infinitely wise, he knows what is best for us.

And, being all-good and all-loving – having given his life for us – he wills what is best for us.

Let us, as St. Basil counsels us, rest secure in the conviction that beyond the possibility of a doubt, God works to effect our welfare, infinitely better than we could ever hope to accomplish or desire it ourselves.

Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787): Uniformity with God’s Will

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