The state of abandonment is a certain mixture of faith, hope, and charity in one single act, which unites the soul to God and to His action.

United, these three virtues together form but one in a single act, the raising of the heart to God, and abandonment to His action.

[…] It is only by means of these three virtues that the possession and enjoyment of God and of His will can be attained.

This adorable object is seen, is loved, and all things are hoped for from it.

Either virtue can with equal justice be called pure love, pure hope, or pure faith, and if the state of which we are speaking is more frequently designated by the last name, it is not that the other theological virtues are excluded, but rather that they may be understood to subsist and to be practised in this state in obscurity.

There can be nothing more secure than this state in the things that are of God; nothing more disinterested than the character of the heart.

On the side of God is the absolute certitude of faith, and on that of the heart is the same certitude tempered with fear and hope.

O most desirable unity of the trinity of these holy virtues! Believe then, hope and love, but by a simple feeling which the Holy Spirit who is given you by God will produce in your soul.

It is there that the unction of the name of God is diffused by the Holy Spirit in the centre of the heart.

[…] This impress of the Holy Spirit in souls inflamed with His love, is called pure love on account of the torrent of delight overflowing every faculty, accompanied by a fulness of confidence and light.

But in souls that are plunged in bitterness it is called pure faith because the darkness and obscurity of night are without alleviation.

Pure love sees, feels, and believes. Pure faith believes without either seeing or feeling. In this is shown the difference between these two states, but this difference is only apparent, not real.

The appearances are dissimilar, but in reality as the state of pure faith is not lacking in charity, neither is the state of pure love lacking in faith nor in abandonment; the terms being applied according to which virtue prevails.

The different gradations of these virtues under the touch of the Holy Spirit form the variety of all supernatural and lofty states. And since God can rearrange them in an endless variety there is not a single soul that does not receive this priceless impress in a character suitable to it.

Jean Pierre de Caussade (1675-1751): Abandonment to Divine Providence, 2,1,3.