Thomas à Kempis: The Beginning of all Temptation Lies in a Wavering Mind and Little Trust in God Wednesday, Oct 6 2010 

So long as we live in this world we cannot escape suffering and temptation. Whence it is written in Job: “The life of man upon earth is a warfare” (Job 7:1).

[…] Yet temptations, though troublesome and severe, are often useful to a man, for in them he is humbled, purified, and instructed.

The saints all passed through many temptations and trials to profit by them, while those who could not resist became reprobate and fell away.

There is no state so holy, no place so secret that temptations and trials will not come. Man is never safe from them as long as he lives, for they come from within us—in sin we were born.

When one temptation or trial passes, another comes; we shall always have something to suffer because we have lost the state of original blessedness.

[…] Little by little, in patience and long-suffering you will overcome them, by the help of God rather than by severity and your own rash ways.

Often take counsel when tempted; and do not be harsh with others who are tempted, but console them as you yourself would wish to be consoled.

The beginning of all temptation lies in a wavering mind and little trust in God, for as a rudderless ship is driven hither and yon by waves, so a careless and irresolute man is tempted in many ways.

Fire tempers iron and temptation steels the just. Often we do not know what we can stand, but temptation shows us what we are.

Above all, we must be especially alert against the beginnings of temptation, for the enemy is more easily conquered if he is refused admittance to the mind and is met beyond the threshold when he knocks.

Someone has said very aptly: “Resist the beginnings; remedies come too late, when by long delay the evil has gained strength.”

First, a mere thought comes to mind, then strong imagination, followed by pleasure, evil delight, and consent. Thus, because he is not resisted in the beginning, Satan gains full entry.

And the longer a man delays in resisting, so much the weaker does he become each day, while the strength of the enemy grows against him.

[…] We should not despair, therefore, when we are tempted, but pray to God the more fervently that He may see fit to help us, for according to the word of Paul, He will make issue with temptation that we may be able to bear it.

Let us humble our souls under the hand of God in every trial and temptation for He will save and exalt the humble in spirit.

Thomas à Kempis (c.1380-1471): The Imitation of Christ, 1, 13.

Alphonsus Liguori: God Wills Only Our Good Monday, Nov 16 2009 

God wills only our good; God loves us more than anybody else can or does love us.

His will is that no one should lose his soul, that everyone should save and sanctify his soul: “Not willing that any should perish, but that all should return to penance” (2 Pet. 3:9); “This is the will of God, your sanctification” (I Thess. 4:3).

God has made the attainment of our happiness his glory. Since he is by his nature infinite goodness, and since, as St. Leo says, goodness is diffusive of itself, God has a supreme desire to make us sharers of his goods and of his happiness.

If then he sends us suffering in this life, it is for our own good: “All things work together unto good” (Rom. 8:28).

 

Even chastisements come to us, not to crush us, but to make us mend our ways and save our souls: “Let us believe that these scourges of the Lord have happened for our amendment and not for our destruction” (Judith 8:27).

God surrounds us with his loving care lest we suffer eternal damnation: “O Lord, thou hast crowned us as with a shield of thy good will” (Ps. 5:13).

He is most solicitous for our welfare: “The Lord is solicitous for me” (Ps. 39:18). What can God deny us when he has given us his own son? “He that spared not even his own son, but delivered him up for us all, how hath he not also, with him, given us all things” (Rom. 8:32).

Therefore we should most confidently abandon ourselves to all the dispositions of divine providence, since they are for our own good.

In all that happens to us, let us say: “In peace, in the self same I will sleep, and I will rest: Because thou, O Lord, hast singularly settled me in hope” (Ps. 4:9-10).

Let us place ourselves unreservedly in his hands because he will not fail to have care of us: “Casting all your care upon him, for he hath care of you” (1 Pet. 5:7).

Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787): Uniformity with God’s Will

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